Traditional recipes

Polpette di vitello (Italian veal meatballs) recipe

Polpette di vitello (Italian veal meatballs) recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Beef

If you do not like to deep fry, here a great recipe for you. These meatballs browned in oil and then cooked with vegetables.

1 person made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 500g veal mince
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 slices stale bread, soaked in milk
  • 100g grated Parmesan
  • 100g grated Pecorino cheese
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 carrot, mince
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 1 stalk celery, minced

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:50min ›Ready in:1hr10min

  1. In a large bowl mix meat, eggs, squeezed and crumbled bread, cheese, salt and pepper. Mix with a spoon and then with your hands to make a smooth mixture.
  2. Wet your hands and take a little of the mixture. Roll between your palms to make a ball the size of a walnut. Place on a place and proceed the same way with the rest of the mixture.
  3. Heat the oil in a large pan, where the meatballs all fit in one layer. Add the meatballs and fry till browned, 4 to 5 minutes, turning them with a spatula.
  4. Pour enough water to cover the meatballs. Add the chopped vegetables and a good pinch of salt. Cover with a lid and cook on medium heat for until the water is almost all evaporated, about 40 minutes. Once in a while, shake the pan to make sure the meatballs do not stick to the bottom.
  5. Remove from heat and serve.

Tip

You can add 1/2 beef stock cube to the water, which adds flavour but then omit salt, as the stock is already salty.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


Recipe – Polpette di Carne (Meatballs)

Polpette di Carne are just meatballs. AGAIN the Italians can make something so crude sounding in English sound so fab in their language. Anyway, these polpette are often served with a tomato sauce, but in my house, they are fried up and served as is, usually with a side salad – after the pasta of course. Speaking of which, Italians do not eat spaghetti with meatballs. They don’t mix the two. More on this subject can be found in this excellent article from the Smithsonian www.smithsonianmag.com. Make sure to scroll down to the end of the page to have a look at one of the sweetest scenes from the Disney movie, “Lady and the Tramp.”

INGREDIENTS

6 ounces Italian sausage (casing removed)

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

3/4 cup Pecorino or Parmesan cheese

DIRECTIONS

1. In a large bowl, mix ground beef and sausage.

2. Add garlic, parsley, breadcrumbs and cheese. Mix by hand until all ingredients are incorporated.

3. Add cream, egg, salt and pepper working again by hand and making sure all ingredients are mixed.

4. Form meatballs into the shape of a somewhat flattened tennis ball.

5. In a large skillet, heat cooking oil on medium-high heat. Add the meatballs, working in batches if necessary, cook for about 4-5 minutes on each side. Lower heat to medium and cook until golden, about another 5-8 minutes.


What Is Polpette?

Polpette are Italian bite size, round-shaped nuggets made of meat (polpette di carne), ricotta (polpette di ricotta), different types of veggies. In this last case you would add main vegetable name to the frase &ldquopolpette di [vegetable name]&rdquo. For example: polpette di zucchine, polpette di melanzane (eggplant meatballs) and so on.

Quite often, Italians also make polpette to use left-over foods such as risotto, boiled meat or chicken breast and even stale bread (polpette di pane).

But unless you specify what kind of &ldquopolpetta&rdquo that is, when you mention this dish, by default everyone thinks of polpette as these classic Italian Meatballs in tomato sauce.

By the way, polpette is plural of polpetta. So it would be actually more correct to ask &ldquowhat Are polpette&rdquo.

Etymology of the word polpetta is most likely coming from Italian word polpa which in translation means pulp.

This totally makes sense, since a mix you prepare to make polpette looks and feels like &ldquopulp&rdquo.


Family Recipe: Polpette di Pane (Bread Meatballs)

Nothing’s more Italian American than a big pot of Sunday Sauce (or Gravy, if that’s your thing) cooking all morning and loaded with all your favorite meats. But, as many of us are rationing our sausages, meatballs and the like, why not try an ancient Italian recipe for these meatless meatballs!

Bread Meatballs (Polpette di Pane)

Ingredients

-1 loaf of bread (any type will do, but preferably a little stale or dried out)

-1 cup chopped parsley (fresh, frozen, or dried)

-1 cup grated parmigiano reggiano, pecorino romano, or alternative hard grating cheese

*Note: With some ingredients being difficult to come by, I’m using Polly-O™ shredded mozzarella. If you’re lucky enough to have fresh mozzarella on hand, just make sure its as dried out as possible.

-Cut or tear the inside of the bread loaf into small pieces and place in a mixing bowl.

-Cover with 1 cup whole milk and let soak.

-Beat the eggs, parsley, salt and pepper into a mixture.

-Pour mixture into soaked bread and mix into a paste.

-Add both cheeses and continue to mix thoroughly.

-Form the mixture into “polpette” and place on an oiled cookie sheet.

-On low heat, sauté 3 gloves of crushed garlic in a frying pan of olive oil.

-When the garlic has turned golden brown, remove from the oil.

-Fry the “polpette” in the oil, browning on all sides as you would with a traditional meatball.

-Finish in the oven at 375 F.

-Remove and let drain, and store polpette overnight to achieve meatball texture.


Polpette Con Sugo (Italian meatballs in tomato sauce) di Nonna Laura

  • Author: Elena
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 4 &ndash 6 1 x
  • Category: Savory
  • Cuisine: Italian

Description

These nutritious homemade meatballs are the perfect meal to make on a Sunday afternoon and freeze for weeks to come! This is another tried and true simple, flavorful and mouthwatering recipe from my Nonna.

Ingredients

Polpette (meatballs)

  • 1 pound of full fat ground beef
  • 2 slices of stale bread
  • 1/2 Cup milk
  • 1/2 Cup parmigiano reggiano, finely grated
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons fresh minced parsley (optional 1 Tbs fresh minced garlic)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Breadcrumbs
  • extra parmigiano for serving
  • 1 large can ( 28 oz ) high quality crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 an onion, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 fresh basil leaves, whole

Instructions

  1. Pour extra-virgin olive oil into a large frying pan and brown the onion (about 7 minutes on medium heat). Add canned tomatoes and simmer, 10-15 minutes. Turn off heat and cover with lid.
  1. Place bread and milk in large mixing bowl, let sit for 2 min, until soft.
  2. Add egg to bread and milk mixture and mix to combine
  3. Add ground meat, parsley, garlic, parmigiano, salt, pepper. Mix WELL with your hands. If it too wet add some breadcrumbs
  4. Take the beef mixture and gently roll between your hands to form 1 1/2-inch meatballs. Use breadcrumbs to prevent sticking. Set prepared meatballs on cookie sheet and cover with plastic wrap.
  5. Plunge your meatballs into pot with the tomato sauce. Turn on heat to medium low. Cook for 20 minutes or until meatballs are fully cooked in the center. Once finished cooking add the basil and cover with lid. Turn off heat.

Cook your favorite pasta or gnocchi, as directed by package, to serve with meatballs. You can also eat without the pasta and serve on yummy bread. Try with Easy Polenta Recipe. Generously top with parmigiano and serve hot!

Notes

Freeze portions of meatballs and sauce in a freezer friendly container and have a healthy meal ready to go! Freeze up to 2 months

Keywords: italian meatballs in tomato sauce recipe, polpette con sugo recipe


HOW DID THE ITALIAN MEATBALLS AND SAUCE ENTER OUR MODERN CUISINE?

But if we are to believe that meatballs were in fact a “noble” dish to begin with, it must be said that there are no traces of this recipe until the fifteenth century, where meatballs are mentioned for the first time in the “Book of the Cooking Art” (Libro de Arte Coquinaria), written by Martino da Como (commonly known as Maestro Martino), who shares the recipe for Italian meatballs and sauce, together with comments on how to best cook the meat of various animals. He goes into detail describing how to slice the meat and mix it with lard and other spices.

It would take several more centuries for Pellegrino Artusi to write in his book “Science of the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well” in 1881 to contest the nobility of the dish, saying they were made using recycled leftover meat. So again, just like it happened with pasta, the origins and purpose of the dish can’t be traced with exact accuracy.


Quick, Classic Meatballs (Polpette)

While spaghetti and meatballs have come to symbolize "Italian food" in the U.S. as much as pizza does, many Americans might be surprised to learn that many Italians have never heard of, let alone eaten, this dish. In the south of Italy and Sicily, small meatballs are sometimes served with pasta, but baseball-sized meatballs on top of a pile of spaghetti are really more of an Italian-American thing.

Meatballs in Italy do indeed exist, but they are generally smaller (ranging from marble-sized to about the size of a golf ball) and eaten either on their own or in soups. They're more of a home-cooking dish than a restaurant item, and they're usually made with a mixture of different meats, rather than just ground beef chuck (as is more common in the U.S.) and a mixture of ground beef, pork, and veal is the ideal combination in terms of flavor and texture. Since ground veal can be difficult to find, though, This recipe calls for just ground beef and pork, but you can substitute some of the total amounts with ground veal.

Feel free to serve these with a simple tomato sauce and pasta, in a sandwich, or alone! They make a great antipasto appetizer, or cocktail party finger food, skewered on toothpicks and perhaps with a dipping sauce, or in small buns as meatball sliders.


In a medium frying pan over medium heat, add 30 millilitres of oil, onion and garlic. Season and cook for five minutes until soft and golden, then tip into a bowl to cool.

In a food processor, add the mince, sausage meat, eggs, one tablespoon oregano, lemon zest and black pepper and blend to a paste. Add breadcrumbs and whiz again to combine. Tip into a bowl, add parmesan and parsley and mix well. Roll into small balls about the diameter of a 20-cent piece.

Place a large, heavy-based pot over medium heat, add 30 millilitres of oil and brown a batch of meatballs for three minutes on all sides. Remove from pan and set aside. Repeat process until all meatballs are cooked.

In the same pot, wipe out leftover oil, add remaining 20 millilitres oil and cook garlic for two minutes or until golden. Add stock, tomato sugo, sugar, remaining oregano and polpetti and bring to a simmer over a medium heat. Reduce heat to low, cook for 20 minutes and check seasoning. Stir sauce through your favourite pasta and serve.


Serves 6 amici

Infused with fresh, sweet tomato sauce, Simona's Calabrese "Polpette" aka Meatballs are soft, juicy and delicious. The sauce is homemade and the meatballs are handcrafted. Check out Simona's traditional recipe below!

As a child, Simona spent her time in the kitchen with her mother, Stella, learning how to cook the traditional recipes of her family and those of Calabria. Growing up, Simona's family raised pigs throughout the year and in January, they would slaughter the pigs and use every single part of the animal. To this day, Simona helps her family with the preparation of the meat from the pigs. Simona says her specialities are the sauce and the ribs. We ask Simona what her son's favorite recipe is and she declares with a glowing smile: "Le mie polpette!"


Polpette Con Sugo (Italian meatballs in tomato sauce) di Nonna Laura

  • Author: Elena
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 40 minutes
  • Total Time: 55 minutes
  • Yield: 4 &ndash 6 1 x
  • Category: Savory
  • Cuisine: Italian

Description

These nutritious homemade meatballs are the perfect meal to make on a Sunday afternoon and freeze for weeks to come! This is another tried and true simple, flavorful and mouthwatering recipe from my Nonna.

Ingredients

Polpette (meatballs)

  • 1 pound of full fat ground beef
  • 2 slices of stale bread
  • 1/2 Cup milk
  • 1/2 Cup parmigiano reggiano, finely grated
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons fresh minced parsley (optional 1 Tbs fresh minced garlic)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Breadcrumbs
  • extra parmigiano for serving
  • 1 large can ( 28 oz ) high quality crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 an onion, diced
  • 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 fresh basil leaves, whole

Instructions

  1. Pour extra-virgin olive oil into a large frying pan and brown the onion (about 7 minutes on medium heat). Add canned tomatoes and simmer, 10-15 minutes. Turn off heat and cover with lid.
  1. Place bread and milk in large mixing bowl, let sit for 2 min, until soft.
  2. Add egg to bread and milk mixture and mix to combine
  3. Add ground meat, parsley, garlic, parmigiano, salt, pepper. Mix WELL with your hands. If it too wet add some breadcrumbs
  4. Take the beef mixture and gently roll between your hands to form 1 1/2-inch meatballs. Use breadcrumbs to prevent sticking. Set prepared meatballs on cookie sheet and cover with plastic wrap.
  5. Plunge your meatballs into pot with the tomato sauce. Turn on heat to medium low. Cook for 20 minutes or until meatballs are fully cooked in the center. Once finished cooking add the basil and cover with lid. Turn off heat.

Cook your favorite pasta or gnocchi, as directed by package, to serve with meatballs. You can also eat without the pasta and serve on yummy bread. Try with Easy Polenta Recipe. Generously top with parmigiano and serve hot!

Notes

Freeze portions of meatballs and sauce in a freezer friendly container and have a healthy meal ready to go! Freeze up to 2 months

Keywords: italian meatballs in tomato sauce recipe, polpette con sugo recipe


Watch the video: #odiocucinare#cucinafacile# Polpettine di patate (May 2022).


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